Local Map


A Map with all the below local features on is currently in preparation.

1. Ballyshannon Public Service Centre - Town Council Office/Library/Citizen’s Advice
2. St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church
3. St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church/Graveyard
4. St. Anne’s Church of Ireland/Graveyard
5. Ballyshannon Presbyterian Church
6. Colaiste Cholmcille Secondary School
7. St. Catherine’s Primary School
8. St. Joseph’s Primary School
9. Little Angels Primary School
10. Gael Scoil Eirne
11. Rockfield Primary School
12. Abbey Centre and Cinema
13. AIB Bank
14. Bank of Ireland
15. Ballyshannon Post Office
16. Abbey Assaroe Graveyard
17. Bayview Health Centre
18. Sheil Hospital
19. Rock Hospital
20. Fr. Tierney GAA Park
21. Ballyshannon Garda Station
22. Ballyshannon Court House
23. Lakeside Centre – Camping/Soccer and Rugby Pitches
24. Bus Stop
25. Ballyshannon Leisure Centre
26. Dorrian’s Imperial Hotel
27. Veterinary Practice
28. William Allingham’s House
29. The Mall Quay
30. Inis Saimer
31. The Abbey Mills
32. Catsby Cave
33. The Abbey Well
34. County Donegal Railway
35. The Fair Green
36. Dicey Reilly’s Pub
37. Sheil House
38. Convent of Mercy
39. Lipsett’s Grocery Shop
40. Gallogley’s Jewellers – Town Clock
41. The Market Yard
42. The Barracks
43. Cathaleen’s Falls
44. Great Northern Railway Station
45. The Purt
46. Rogans
47. Rory Gallagher Place
48. The Workhouse & Fever Hospital
49. Stratherne
50. Portnason House
51. Inis Saimer House
52. Port na Marbh
53. The Falls of Assaroe
54. Mullaghnashee
55. Paupers Grave

• 28. to 55. Places of Historical Interest

28. William Allingham House
This is the house where local poet William Allingham (1824 – 1889) was born.  After working in the Bank and the Custom service he moved to England, where he embraced a full time literary career.  Among his best known works are ‘Adieu to Ballyshanny’, ‘The Fairies’, ‘Abbey Assaroe’ and ‘Laurence Bloomfield’.

29. The Mall Quay
This was once a thriving port of Ballyshannon.  Sailing and steam ships came and went here from Europe and the Americas.  Wool, leather and salted fish went out from this port. Cargoes of wine, timber, coal, coke and china clay for the famous pottery of Belleek were imported.  Shipping declined with the advent of the railways in the 1860’s and also due to the difficulty of getting ships across the sand bar, which you will see if you look outwards towards the sea.  Today, the Mall Quay is used by fishermen leaving to fish the estuary and the wide expanses of Donegal Bay.

30. Inis Saimer
This little island is said to be the spot where the first inhabitants of Ireland landed.  Parthalon, a chieftain from Scythia (near modern Macedonia) landed here around 2700 B.C.  Reputed to have killed his wife’s hound in a fit of jealous rage, he was filled with remorse and named the island after the dog, which was called Saimer.  Later, it was the citadel of the O’Muldory, O’Donnell and Gallagher chiefs. The quaint house was built in the 19th Century by the Erne Fishery Company to store their nets and equipment.  It is now a private residence.

31. The Abbey Mills

These corn and flax mills lay in ruin for many years, the giant wheels were restored by the Abbey Mill Trust in the late 1980’s and a coffee shop now welcomes visitors.  The Cistercians pioneered the use of waterpower here many centuries ago.

32. Catsby Cave
This grotto like cave contains the remains of a stone altar on which Mass was secretly celebrated during Penal times.  Here, you will also find tow hollow stones for holy water.

33. The Abbey Well
This well is associated with St. Patrick and St. Colmcille.  St. Barron is reputed to have founded his church here with the help of his cousin St. Colmcille who later founded the famous monastery of Iona off the coast of Scotland. 

34. County Donegal Railway
A plaque marks the County Donegal Railway Line at this spot.  This narrow gauged railway line opened in 1905 and served Creevy, Rossnowlagh, Ballintra, Laghey and continued on through Donegal and Barnes Gap.  The line closed down in January 1960.

35. The Fair Green
In the days gone by, hiring fairs were held here.  Young men and women hired themselves out as farm labourers and domestic servants to wealthy farmers from all over Ulster and Scotland.  Fairs were also held where horses, cattle, pigs and poultry were bought and sold.

36. Dicey Reilly’s Pub
These buildings were part of the Delap estate, home of Margaret Delap.  She married ‘French’ Tom Barton, one of the Wine Geese and they left Ireland for France in 1722.  ‘French’ Tom Barton from Curraghmore near Boa Island in County Fermanagh founded the wine firm known as Barton and Guestier.  He was educated in Ballyshannon and his uncles William and Tom Dickson were merchants in Ballyshannon.

37. Sheil House
This was the former residence of the Sheil family who leased the commercial fishing rights on the Erne Estuary from the Conolly Estate in the 19th centuary.

38. Convent of Mercy
The Sisters of Mercy came here from Kinsale, Co. Cork in 1867.  The Convent building was built in 1884, aided by a large donation from William Stephens.

39. Lipsett’s Grocery Shop
This is the birth place of Hazel (Corscadden) Blair, mother of British Prime Minister Tony Blair.  Her mother’s maiden name was Lipsett and Hazel was born over the shop.

40. Gallogley’s Jewellers – Town Clock
In the early 18th Century the richest man in Ireland was William Conolly, speaker of the Irish House of Commons.  Conolly was born in a house adjacent to this building, known as Conolly’s Inn.  The distinctive building you see now was constructed by the Belfast Bank in 1878.  Later it became the Royal Bank.  It is a fine example of Scottish streetscape design and the attractive clock and bell tower was built to assuage local concern over the base of the building, which extended on to the street.

41. The Market Yard
In 1423 Niall Garbh O’Donnell built Ballyshannon Castle, on the site now known as the Market Yard, to command the ford over the Erne.  In 1597 this was the scene of the Battle of Ballyshannon when Sir Conyers Clifford’s Crown army was repelled by Red Hugh O’Donnell.  The first Baron of Ballyshannon, Henry Folliot, took over the castle after the decline of O’Donnell’s fortunes in 1606.  The castle was demolished in 1720 and a cavalry barracks was built here.  In more recent times the site was used as a market yard where locals bought and sold mainly farm produce.

42. The Barrack’s
This building started life in 1700 as a British Military Barracks.  Of all the colourful tales associated with this building, the most famous concerns the Green Lady.  The wife of a British officer, she was killed in the Barracks, many say by her husband.  It is said that her ghost haunts the building to this day and many locals would have claimed to have seen her.  In 1793 Robert Stewart – later to become the infamous Viscount Castlereagh – had a vision of a naked child covered in blood emerging from the flames of a roaring fire on a winters night and growing more fearsome as it approached him.  He related the story to the famous Scottish writer Sir Walter Scott who referred to it in his writings.  Later William Allingham wrote a poem called the Goblin Child of Ballyshannon.

43. Cathaleen’s Falls
Work commenced on the Hydro-Electric power stations at Cathaleens Falls and Cliff in 1946.  Building the two dams involved major construction and excavation work and was completed in the early 1950’s.  Casualties of the project were the famed Assaroe Falls and the distinctive 14 Arch Bridge. A salmon hatchery at the power station produces smolts to stock the Erne and salmon runs are monitored by a fish counter at Cathaleens Falls fish pass.

44. Great Northern Railway Station
Built in the 1860’s, it served as a means of transport for goods, which had been landed at the Mall Quay.  The GNR was largely responsible for turning Bundoran into a major tourist resort.  It was closed in 1957.

45. The Purt
This is one of the oldest parts of Ballyshannon, as well as once being the main road through the town the area was also associated with the shipping and fishing tradition of Ballyshannon.

46. Rogan’s
Since 1830 the Rogan family have been tying flies and supplying anglers all over the world.  In 1892 a 46 pound salmon was hooked on the river Conway in England on a Silver and Blue made by Rogans.

47. Rory Gallagher Place
This area is dedicated to the memory of Rory Gallagher, world famous Rock and Blues Guitarist whose first home was situated in East Port, Ballyshannon. 

48. The Workhouse & Fever Hospital
Built in 1842 to house the poor of the area, it served people from Ballyshannon, Belleek, Boho, Churchill, Devenish, Glenade, Kinlough and Bundoran.  During the Great Famine, it became very overcrowded as the victims poured into the building searching for food.  At the height of the famine the workhouse contained 900 poor souls ever though it had been designed to house 500.  In later years, part of it was used as the Rock Hospital and legendary blues and rock guitarist Rory Gallagher first saw the light of day under its roof.  Directly opposite stands the building, which was the Fever Hospital for the workhouse.  In 1922 the De La Salle Brothers opened a school here, which closed in 2000.

49. Stratherne
Stratherne was once the home of Robert Myles whose family owned all the mills and warehouses overlooking the estuary.  They also generated electricity for the town of Ballyshannon and the surrounding areas as early as 1908.

50. Portnason House
This house was built circa 1778 and subsequently became a place of residence for the British Military.  The field on the right of the avenue was used as a drill area and to this day is known as the Parade field.

51. Inis Saimer House
This beautiful house was built in the late 19th century by local solicitor Ross Todd.  Its most famous owner was Major Sproule Myles who was wounded and decorated in the Great War and later served as a member of the Irish Parliament for many years.

52. Port na Marbh
In English this means Port of the Dead.  Before bridges were built across the river Erne, the dead of the south side of the town were transported by boat from this spot.  The journey was made in silence until the boats landed at Lug na nDeoir – the Hallow of Tears.  From here they went to their final resting place at Abbey Assaroe.

53. The Falls of Assaroe
The Falls, long a victim of progress, once inspired writers such as Arthur Young, Richard Twiss, Humphrey Davy and William Allingham.  Dr. Twiss wrote this in 1775 …. ‘At the bottom of the Falls, porpoises and seals disport themselves among the waves’.

54. Mullaghnashee
This is the ancient burial mound of  King Aedh Ruadh (Sidh Aedh), who ruled Ireland in the 3rd century B.C. He drowned at the waterfall, which became known as Eas Aodha Ruaidh or Assaroe.  His daughter Macha succeeded him and Armagh and Emhain Macha were named after her. Sir Conyers Clifford, Governor of Connacht, based his camp here during the Crown from Red Hugh O’Donnell in 1597.  A star shaped fort was erected on Mullaghnashee by the British in the 1798 period.

55.  Paupers Graveyard
This site was used as the burial ground for the poor of the area.  Countless poor souls were laid to rest here during the Great Famine of 1845-1850.  The site was marked in 1995 by a plaque erected by the Donegal Association in New York.

 

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